Knife Education: Doing our part

blogboard“Knives are Bad” was the title of the blogger’s post. The writer had my full attention at that point, so I followed the link to a young mother’s blog.

There she shared a story of her young daughter making a birthday cake out of bubbles as she took her bath. The daughter showed her mom a pretend knife she planned to use to cut the first slice. The mom told her “No, you can’t play with knives. You do not hold knives.” The daughter said, “But I need to cut the cake.” “No knives. Make it a fork,” her mother instructed, so the daughter then pretended to use a fork instead.

Then the mom addresses her readers- “That’s right, I don’t even let her play with imaginary knives.” The mom ended the post with this question- “Overprotective much?”

Now, we understand the mom’s concern for the safety of her daughter and yet, she missed an opportunity to teach and instead left the daughter with- “Knives are bad.”

I couldn’t let this one pass. She had asked a fair information seeking question to her readers, so I paused, took a deep breath and replied-

“Yes,  you are being overprotective. As a father of 4 and a knife collector, knives aren’t bad in and of themselves, nor do knives kill- people do. Helping your daughter understand “we must be careful with knives or any other pointed objects” is wise and responsible, as a parent, but conditioning a child that knives are bad is really not the point you were trying to make.”

Now I don’t consider myself the Knife Collector World Association’s ambassador to the web, but I do try to spread the word a little everywhere I go. And in this case, she asked me!

Knife collectors, we must do our part to help folks see knives aren’t the enemy!

Let me ask you, just what is our part in helping folks have a proper understanding of knives? Are we as collectors obligated to actually do something here? Can we not simply let KnifeRights and the AKTI head off threatening anti-knife legislation? Do we really care that millions of folks see knives as bad things?

It really boils down to us feeling comfortable to have a mature conversation. Yes, they are entitled to their opinions, but we wouldn’t hesitate to add our 2 cents to balance things a little, now would we?

And, if we’ll use the web share in our hobby, will we not also use it to help educate web users on the benefits and correct ill-informed viewpoints about knives?

Let’s just agree to this- we all will try to spread the word a little everywhere we go and especially as opportunities present themselves.

Image credit: blogs.worldbank.org

Published in: on August 28, 2009 at 9:09 am  Comments (2)  
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Cutlery News Journal is not your typical knife website

Beginner

Geek Rated: Beginner

Websites come in a variety of flavors nowadays. As we look around we see those with little dancing bears, with tons of flashing pictures, and even those with intro movies.

Cutlery News Journal is a media platform of knife news and this is why its looks different than most websites. It was designed to be straightforward. I wanted it to be easy to read, and in the case of the Audio Interview Series- listen to, and easy to find the knife news you are interested in. 

Why does CNJ look different than a typical website?

Actually, CNJ is not a typical website, though technically it is a website. Instead, it is what is called a weblog, or blog, for short. Blogs are, for the most part, mainstream today (77% of active internet users read blogs), but even still there are very few knife blogs. (About the only active knife related blogs you will find are Corporate Blogs- those associated with a knife company, media or knife store).

So, what’s the difference?

One of the primary differences between a blog and a website is how the “information” is presented. Instead of a homepage that stays the same day after day, CNJ’s “homepage” is more like a newspaper in that it changes with each new story, or post. Moreover, as a new post is published, it is located right up at the top of the page- then the other stories are displayed in chronological order.

Speaking of newspapers, did you know 95% of the top 100 US newspapers have reporter blogs? It is true. News sources are going online. Another interesting stat is over 900,000 posts are written to blogs everyday. (The folks who write on blogs are called bloggers, in case you are ever asked).

If the blogging phenomena interest you then here is latest report by Technorati on The State of The Blogosphere.

CNJ’s archiving ability is far superior to that of the Dewey Decimal System

Please don’t ask me to try to explain the Dewey Decimal System, because I can’t, although I do remember it from grade school. But think about it, over a year’s time, the quantity of stories/articles posted here at CNJ will number into the hundreds, therefore, it is critical this information can be easily accessed. Well, that is where the CNJ media platform shows its real muscle.

Next up in the Getting to Know CNJ Series: Finding topics you are interested in.

Published in: on October 15, 2008 at 12:25 pm  Leave a Comment  
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