Knife collection direction- Which way do you go?

fun

Knife Collecting is Fun!

Knife collecting is fun. Of course, there is the camaraderie of other collectors, but for today, that’s not what I’m talking about. Instead, it is the excitement of seeking out new knives to buy. The rush of finding one you want. Sometimes, even the nervousness you feel about wanting to buy an expensive knife, and then the mental games you play justifying the decision to go ahead and get it. All that is the fun, no doubt.

We also love to get our new prize home and then figuring out what to do with it. Display it? Use it? Put it in the safe or drawer, or is it one for the special glass case? Decisions. Decisions. Still all the fun part.

Which way do I go?

Which way to go?

Eventually though, every collector comes to a point where a decision must be made- What is my collecting direction here? Most of the time the collection at that point is made up of knives we like, but are really a bunch of random knives.

If you are like me, you have probably found yourself with a hodgepodge of knives too. All nice knives, yes. All knives you like, sure. But is there a theme or pattern you are following, or are you going to continue to buy just any knife that tickles your fancy?

What direction are you headed?

What direction are you headed?

All the “knife experts” advise us to make a deliberate decision to specialize, whether in a particular type, era, brand, etc. But even within the knife type, for example, there is a myriad of decisions. What about handle materials? Patterns? Makers? Blade types? On and on we could go here, but I think you get the point.

I, for one, have in the past subscribed to this line of thinking, but of late, have decided not to over analyze it. Instead, I’m now sitting back and enjoying knife collecting for what it is- buying knives I like. Knives that are cool, whether old or new. Knives that speak to me when I first see them. Then let the chips fall where they may.

The heck with this, “What do you know about ____ type knives?” Yes, when we go with the flow like this, we run the risk new collectors face, like overpaying because we aren’t as familiar with values. Or buying a maker whose popularity or appeal has peaked, or even falling victim to “buying into the hype” of a knife company’s marketing, only to later realize the knife maybe isn’t high quality or demand.

But in the end, does it really matter? While we don’t want to waste our money, we collect because we enjoy knives, right? Yeah, one day we are going t0 sell them, and may not get all of our money out, but let’s go back to the beginning and reexamine why we started collecting in the first place.

TiggerKnife collecting is fun and let’s keep it that way.

Hunting ain’t no fun when you can’t find the game

liarHow many times since you started collecting have you heard fellow knife enthusiasts say they love “The Hunt?”  You immediately know they are referring to the time spent diligently searching for the next knife to add to their collection. Well, I’m here to tell you, if you don’t know it already- they are lying through their teeth.

Yes, I’m going to tell a dirty little secret. And one that none of the others have the manhood (s0rry ladies) to admit-

Hunting ain’t no fun- not at all.

Don’t get me wrong, they love to find a knife to add to their collection, and I do too, but that ASSUMES we do in fact- find it. In my mind though, “the hunt” is over at that point.

There are only a few things I enjoy more than getting a new knife to add to my collection. You know, you get home with it. Carefully unwrap it. Then sit there gazing over it like it is the Hope Diamond or something. Not even wanting to open and close it too much, so it doesn’t wear. Then gingerly placing it in the display, like hanging a trophy mount on the wall.

hunterSure, the kill, if you want to call it that- the bagging of the knife- is fun, but we had to find it first, so maybe we best break “hunting” down- I guess we can call the first part, “the hunt” and the second, “the kill.”  I enjoy bagging the object of my desire just as much as the next guy, but it is the hunting part I hate.

I’m not talking about just casually out looking around and happening to see a knife to buy here. Nor am I talking about simply window shopping as if any knife will do for the next kill. No, I’m talking about hunting for a specific knife. A particular knife that I have already decided to buy…..if I can just find the doggone thing. To me nothing is more frustrating than to have already mentally bought it (and spent the $$$, at least in my mind) and then not able to find the sucker. There is no way knife guys and gals enjoy this part, unless they are into pain, so they mask how they really feel by telling us, “Oh, I love the hunt.”

In case you are wondering what set me off today. Well, I’m starving- that’s where I am right now. I’m “hunting” for a knife that I’ve got months into and still can’t find one. I keep hitting dead-ends. I’ll get a lead on one and then run it down only to find it already sold. I scouted the entire 8 hundred- million square feet of Blade Show. I’ve posted at iKnifeCollector and knife forums, saved the search on eBay with email notices, emailed dealers and looked at more “dealer” websites that I care to admit. At this point, I simply don’t know what else to do. I think I’m going to pass out from malnutrition.

skeletonwgunIf I was hunting to eat, I’d be major skin and bones- probably eyeing my fellow hunter ’bout right now too.

So, let’s all come clean….if for nothing else, but to make me feel better anyway.

And please don’t tell me I’m just a impulsive compulsive knife collector who is too preoccupied with finding knives to enjoy knife collecting.

*******

I’ll leave it at this- the next time one of our fellow collectors comes strolling up to me telling me how much fun he’s having out hunting for his next trophy knife, you may be reading about me jumping on him right then and there. The next day’s headlines will read- “Knife collector goes berserk and attacks fellow collector.”

Photo credits: redstatepapa.blogspot.com; clothedwithscarlet.typepad.com; chromatism.net

Wall Street investor put his money in collectibles

Talk about getting out of the market, Antique Week reports in the April 13th edition, on an investor who got out in time. Then he turned around and jumped into collectibles as his investment of choice.

Ralph DeLuca said, “I didn’t like what I was seeing.”

So, he cashed in well before it was common knowledge things were out of kilter. He added that he wanted to deal in more tangible items.

1933 King King Poster- sold for $345,000

1933 King Kong Poster- sold for $345,000

Now to knife collectors what he jumped into might be considered an odd place to stash millions. Yet he had a hunch and followed it. He could have ended up in any area of collectibles, but he chose vintage posters. Yeap, posters.

Last month, he paid a new world record for an original 1931 Universal studio poster of Dracula, staring Bela Lugosi. The price? A cool $310,000. And at the same auction he paid $107,000 for a 1932 poster.

Mr. DeLuca now owns over a 1,000 entertainment posters, but he also buys other types too. He remains confident that all quality antiques, sporting items, firearms and collectibles are good investments.

“If you collect for a hobby, buy what you want. But if you collect for an investment, look for the best. I look for the rarest and the best.”                                                                                                                                                                         David DeLuca

I don’t know if we want somebody like this guy cornering the knife collector market or not? All it would take is one or two guys like this to change our market dramatically. It would be fascinating to watch though, wouldn’t it?

The Next Generation Knife Collector Community

I want to join a knife community. I’ve looked at a bunch. Searched the web- deep and wide- and it ain’t there. Not like what I’m looking for.

What I am looking for is a combination- 24/7 Knife Show, YouTube, Flickr, MySpace, FaceBook, Yahoo Group, Cutlery News Journal and knife forum- all rolled into one, all exclusively for knife collectors. (more…)

2009 Knife Community Survey is now closed

crowd1The first official knife community survey is history. A record 1308 collectors participated.

If you missed out, we’ll run other surveys, polls and contests here at Cutlery News Journal.

In fact, my suggestion is to sign up for CNJ UPDATES so you won’t miss out on the happenings, which is really important, especially if you only check in off and on.

2009knifecommunitysurveyreportcoverI’ll be burning the mid-night oil studying over the results. A formal report will be published once it is complete.

The results are significant because the collectors represented all age groups, knife types and years collecting.

The entire knife community rallied around this project, in particular the knife folks on the forums and YouTube.

I’ve taken a sneak peek and think you will be surprised by many of the findings.

Thanks again to all who took part.

2009 Knife Community Survey draws to a close

surveyJust a quick note regarding the 2009 Knife Community Survey, we are closing it the end of this month.

Many of you are new readers of CNJ since we started the survey a couple of months ago and I want to invite you to participate.

Take 2009 Knife Community Survey. It is only 10 straight forward questions- nothing personal. No name. No email address.

Once completed, the survey results will represent the most comprehensive collector profile in the history of organized knife collecting. It will be a real-time snap of today’s knife collector. Moreover, the findings will provide valuable insights for all in the knife industry on a wide range of topics and trends.

Thank you for your support and participation.

Blade Magazine Article

bladelogoRecently I was asked if I’d be interested in writing an article for Blade Magazine on knife collector resources on the web. If you are a regular reader of CNJ, you know what my answer was. Well, I understand the article is in April’s edition and subscribers are starting to receive it now. 

Blade is a much needed resource for collectors of all types of knives. Really, the only thing I don’t like is having to wait for it each month and then for it to arrive by snail mail.

Blade and other traditional print pubs are the pull-up-to-the-table full-course meal, while CNJ is more the late night snack of collector news.

If you are checking out Cutlery News Journal for the first time, possibly as a result of this article, allow me to first say, “Welcome.”

One of the topics we have been looking into lately here at CNJ is  Who is today’s knife collector? And right now, we are conducting the 2009 Knife Community Survey and would like to have your participation.

So far, collectors from 8 knife forums; various email lists; local, state and national collector clubs and associations; and our regular CNJ subscribers have joined in. Plus, Jeff Smith, YouTube’s Cutlerylover, did a video broadcast to his subscribers and within 24 hours of him posting it over 800 knife enthusiasts from YouTube took the survey.

Thanks for checking out CNJ. After you have looked around, please take part in the survey.

And when you need a little late night snack, come on back.

The Joy of Knife Collecting

joy002It is a pleasure when I run into a knife collector sharing his joy for our hobby. Well, it happened again. 

I know “Joy” isn’t a word we often use when talking about knife collecting. Typically our hobby is associated with more manly words.

Joy is defined as a feeling of great pleasure. It is more commonly associated with things like- words in Christmas songs, evidence of one’s faith, and propagating, but knife collecting?! 

On his website, this collector tells the story of how and when he started collecting at a young age. He then describes a few of the antique knives still in his collection and that are kept in his cabinet- in everyday sight.

It was his expression of joy that stood out to me; it was very refreshing. He tells his story, and then ends with-

“Still, there is a certain childish joy I get when I look over at my antique knives there in the cabinet…. I know it (the joy) will never get old no matter how long I live.”

_

-Let us not allow the joy of knife collecting to get old either.

 

The 2009 Knife Community Survey

cnjreaderpollsOne of the benefits of the web is information can be exchanged easily and with just a few clicks you have the opportunity to help shape the direction of the knife collector industry.

If you have participated in a CNJ survey, you know my goal is simply to develop initiatives, topics or, in some cases, platforms to get the Establishment’s attention.  And let me assure you the powers that be are paying attention to what you say here at Cutlery News Journal.

I need your help by taking part in the Knife Community Survey, as well as to help make others aware of it. There are thousands of knife collectors who may not be web savvy yet, or a frequent visitor here at CNJ, so please encourage them to come participate in this important survey.

I would also appreciate it if you would post a note and link in any forum you are a part of directing folks this way. I’ve added this survey to the right-side column of the CNJ homepage too. Simply click that page, highlight and copy the address of the CNJ survey page.

The knife collector associations’ leadership wants to better adapt to today’s online knife collector and your information will be invaluable, so please take part and encourage others to also. This survey provides for a comprehensive profile of the knife collector community.

Direct Link to the 2009 Knife Community Survey

Thank you

Scott