Early American cutlery manufacturing from England’s perspective

sheffieldsteelamericaSheffield Steel And America- A century of commercial and technological interdependence 1830- 1930, by Geoffrey Tweedale.

If you enjoy learning about the early cutlery days, then here is a book you should add to your library, plus it is written by a Sheffield cutlery history expert.

I wanted this book because it discusses American cutlery history- from England’s perspective.

You will find the early steel and cutlery industries go hand in hand. Sheffield never considered the US cutlery manufacturers a threat until it was too late and by then our knife companies had captured the US market. This was about the same time America’s steel output, and quality, rivaled Sheffield’s. The combination of lack of demand for Sheffield’s cutlery and steel by America devastated Sheffield’s economy at that time as we were their largest customer for both.

Mr. Tweedale is a Sheffield cutlery expert and author of The Sheffield Knife Book. I was pointed to him a couple of years ago while researching a C & X Lockwood Brothers elephant toenail in my collection.

Don’t expect this book to be a riveting page turner, like a John Grisham novel, but it is a BUY recommendation for students of early American cutlery history.

Publisher’s overview and table of contents.

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One CommentLeave a comment

  1. This looks like a very interesting read – I’ve never seen a book discussing the American industry from a Sheffield point-of-view before. Might take a look.


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